I’ve been to the USA a number of times, and each time I go, the list of places I want to see grows. One of my fondest trips was a month long loop around the Northeast, starting and finishing in Chicago. A carload of buddies and I hit most of the major cities in the area, but we also managed to balance that with a few locations closer to nature. If you’re planning to drive around the Eastern Seaboard, consider these places when you go.

Cape Cod, Massachusetts

A Beach in Cape Cod, MA

I visited Cape Cod on that loop, and it served perfectly as a quiet break from a road trip itinerary otherwise dominated by cityscapes. The sleepy town of Provincetown was our destination on the furthermost tip of the hook that is Cape Cod. We walked on beaches and explored MacMillan Pier Marina, but the best thing to do in Cape Cod is to eat seafood. You don’t live this far out into the sea without mastering the art of shellfish.

Atlantic City, New Jersey

Atlantic City

Image via Flickr by shinya

I’m a big fan of Las Vegas, so the idea of Atlantic City also intrigues me. Atlantic City is billed as the Las Vegas of the East Coast, but it really does have its own character. With its long boardwalk along the Atlantic Ocean, you can easily zip out for some fresh air, something severely lacking in most casinos.

For the kids and kids at heart, the boardwalk actually extends out into the ocean, sporting a massive amusement area, not unlike those in Galveston or Santa Monica. I’m also a massive “Boardwalk Empire” fan, so picturing the boardwalk during the Roaring 20s and pretending to be a mob boss is all I’d think about.

Ocean City, Maryland

Two states south of Atlantic City lies Ocean City. A resort town on a thin strip of land bounded by the Atlantic to the east and Isle of Wight Bay to the west, Ocean City is very much a family vacation spot. It boasts a water park, an amusement park, and plenty of sandy beach. Don’t worry, though, as there are also plenty of golf courses for the parents to escape.

The presence of a Ripley’s Believe It or Not! definitely signals that you’re in tourist territory. But if you’re just after a beach break, the wide, sandy beaches of Ocean City will definitely do the trick.

Luray Caverns, Virginia

Luray Caverns, Virginia

Although not on the coast, Luray is definitely off the beaten track. Located just two hours from Washington, D.C., Luray is perfectly nestled in Shenandoah National Park. There are three reasons to visit Luray: the incredible ribs and wings at Uncle Buck’s Steakhouse, the hiking in nearby forests, and the ancient Luray Caverns.

There are three reasons to visit Luray: the incredible ribs and wings at Uncle Buck’s Steakhouse, the hiking in nearby forests, and the ancient Luray Caverns.

Acadia National Park, Maine

Acadia National Park, ME

Image via Flickr by heipei

If you make it as far north as Acadia National Park, you might feel like you’ll run out of land soon. And you will, as the park is located on an island off the coast of Maine in the far Northeast. Acadia is a beautiful spot year round. Camping and hiking are popular in the summer, with hundreds of trails of all difficulties. In the autumn, the island is awash in oranges and browns, as the canopy becomes the trail. The winter then brings snow, where hiking turns into cross-country skiing.

As a traveller, it is a constant balancing act between seeing what you came to see and exploring serendipitously. By taking a detour to some of these lesser-known destinations, you can not only make your dollar go a little further, but also create some unique experiences that few others will.

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